Cincinnati community makes a difference with Thanksgiving food gifts

                You might say it starts in the kitchen, like the kitchen at Good Plates where they've been preparing since Saturday, you might think it ends in line when the last people pass the entrance for the Thanksgiving they otherwise wouldn't have.  As the rest of us sit around the tradition table tomorrow, it's important to keep in mind that it never ends if it starts in the heart.  This was the starting point for Jamie and Andrew Schlancer, who own the Good Plates restaurant near the University of Cincinnati.  “The fact that we are now in the third year of being able to do this, we are fortunate.”  Andrew has been examining broths and other combinations, hoping as he puts it “as much food as possible for as many people as possible.” Their goal today was a thousand people.  requirement?  just come.  With seven-year-old Olivia and three-year-old Kenzie, Elizabeth Holt, who has one on the way, is struggling to put holiday food on the table.  "I don't qualify for food stamps," she told us.  "So, this really helps."  She had no idea about the food giveaway, it happened the day before on Facebook.  Ed Roberts, of Clifton, was also waiting patiently in line, wearing a "Who Dey" sweatshirt.  “He knows me and my family appreciates it,” he said, before adding, “Go to the Bengals.”  Hundreds of other struggling people have been fed in Block Ministries in West Price Hill, where the impetus has come from within.” We're number one for a lot of the wrong reasons,” said Chris Staser, who lives across the street. “These are my neighbors and me. love them.  I love this neighborhood.  It's a place worth living, it's a place worth raising my family in, it's a place worth caring for." Throughout the community today, there have been bits of generosity and goodwill and gratitude. Bryce Hill has a large Latino population, which is why Elder High School has been dealing with Junior Jeff Orozco and Senior Allen Morales with the language barrier."As Spanish speakers, we help the Hispanic community," Morales said. Orozco comes from a family that doesn't speak English fluently. "It's always good to know there's Someone to help.” Happy. They’re like, “Oh yeah, yeah.  I'm here already ready.  Tell me when, tell me when.” He called them and heard the excitement in their voices. “Forty seniors and their parents delivered a hundred turkeys today, gave Thanksgiving, and came back with an intangible gift of their own.” And they visited someone they had never interacted with before. , "Say tom og with the Spiritual Boosters at school. "So, stepping out of your comfort zone on the West Side. It's really seeing the less fortunate. And I think they come back with a greater appreciation for God's blessings in their lives."
            </p><div>
                <strong class="dateline">Cincinnati -</strong>                                          <p>You might say it starts in the kitchen, like the one at Good Plates where they've been preparing since Saturday.

You might think it ends in line when the last people pass through the entrance for the Thanksgiving celebration they otherwise wouldn’t have.

But as the rest of us sit around the tradition table tomorrow, it’s important to keep in mind that it never ends if it starts in the heart.

This was the starting point for Jamie and Andrew Schlancer, who own Good Plates near the University of Cincinnati.

“We’ve wanted to do anything like this since before that was a real restaurant,” Jimmy said before opening the doors to a long pier for those in need. “The fact that we are now in our third year of being able to do this, we are fortunate.”

Andrew has been checking out gravy and other fixings, hoping to “get as much food as possible for as many people as possible”.

Their target today was a thousand people.

the condition? just come.

With seven-year-old Olivia and three-year-old Kenzie, Elizabeth Holt, who has one on the way, struggles to put holiday food on the table.

She told us, “I don’t qualify for food stamps.” “So, this really helps.”

She had no idea about food gifts, it happened the day before on Facebook.

Ed Roberts, of Clifton, was also waiting patiently in line, wearing a “Who Dey” sweatshirt.

“I know my family and I appreciate that,” he said, before adding, “And off to the Bengals.”

Hundreds of other struggling people were fed at Block Ministries in West Price Hill, where the impetus came from within.

“We’re in first place a lot of times for a lot of the wrong reasons,” said Chris Stasser, who lives across the street. “These are my neighbors and I love them. I love this neighborhood. It’s a place worth living, it’s a place worth raising my family in, it’s a place worth living.”

Throughout society today, there were healthy bits of generosity, goodwill, and gratitude.

Bryce Hill has a large Latino population, which is why Elder High School had Junior Jeff Orozco and Senior Allen Morales to deal with the language barrier.

“As Spanish speakers, we help the Hispanic community,” Morales said.

Orozco comes from a family that does not speak English fluently.

“It’s always nice to know someone is there to help,” he told us.

We listened to him while we were on a call, and he translated for us afterward.

“Sometimes they look happy. They’re like, ‘Yeah, yeah.'” I’m here already ready. Tell me when, tell me when. Call them and hear the excitement in their voice.

Forty freshman seniors and their parents handed out a hundred turkeys today.

They gave Thanksgiving, and they came back with an intangible gift of their own.

“They’ll walk four flights of degrees and visit someone they’ve never interacted with before,” says Cy Tom Ogg with Spiritual Boosters at the School.

“And so, stepping out of your comfort zone on the West Side. It’s really seeing the less fortunate. And I think they come back with a greater appreciation for God’s blessings in their lives.”

                                </div>

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: