Des Moines Water Works partners with cooperative to clean drinking water in Iowa

                Des Moines Water Works is partnering with a large agricultural cooperative to limit pollutants in Iowa's rivers.  “Everyone wants clean water. We know the state is heavily dependent on agriculture, so we need to find a way to do both,” Landus agronomist Dan Bjorklund said.  Agricultural retailer Landus is working with Des Moines Water Works for the first time.  For years, Des Moines Water Works has tried everything to keep the state's waterways clean, even litigation against farmers for fertilizer runoff.  The previous rivals are now working together in hopes of allowing agriculture and clean water to coexist.  a very unusual partnership,” said Ted Corrigan, CEO of Des Moines Water Works.  “We believe Landus Cooperative, in its leadership, shares our vision for improving water quality here in the state,” Corrigan said.  The idea is to use a plot of land on Water Works property as a demonstration.  Landus will bring more than 500 farmers over the summer to show them sustainable soil practices that will improve Iowa's water quality, including the use of cover crops and soil sampling to be more accurate on the amount of fertilizer needed, allowing farmers to use fewer chemicals.  and recycle nutrients and not push them too far into the soil profile and into the water,” Bjorklund said.  Des Moines Water Works says the rivers have become so polluted that it has become increasingly difficult for their equipment to purify the water that 600,000 Iowans drink.  "It's important to my grandchildren. And just a legacy — wanting to make a difference," Bjorklund said.
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                <strong class="dateline">DES MOINES, Iowa—</strong>                                             <p>Des Moines Water Works is partnering with a large agricultural cooperative to limit pollutants in Iowa's rivers. 

“Everyone wants clean water. We know the state is heavily dependent on agriculture, so we need to find a way to do both,” Landus agronomist Dan Bjorklund said.

Agricultural retailer Landus is working with Des Moines Water Works for the first time.

For years, Des Moines Water Works has tried everything to keep the state’s waterways clean, even suing farmers for fertilizer runoff.

The former rivals are now working together in hopes of allowing agriculture and clean water to coexist.

“This is a very unusual partnership,” said Ted Corrigan, CEO of Des Moines Water Works.

“We believe Landus Cooperative, in its leadership, shares our vision for improving water quality here in the state,” Corrigan said.

The idea is to use a plot of land on Water Works property as a demonstration.

Landus will bring more than 500 farmers over the summer to show them sustainable soil practices that will improve Iowa’s water quality, including using cover crops and soil sampling to be more specific about the amount of fertilizer needed, allowing farmers to use fewer chemicals.

“It’s a great way to really cycle and recycle nutrients and not get them too far into the soil profile and into the water,” Bjorklund said.

Des Moines Water Works says the rivers have become so polluted that it has become increasingly difficult for their equipment to purify the water that 600,000 Iowans drink.

“It’s important to my grandchildren. And just a legacy — wanting to make a difference,” Bjorklund said.

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