How a Massachusetts nonprofit is saving food about to get thrown out

                                        Erica: The contents of this meal could have easily ended up.  Instead, he was saved.  >> This is MGH.  It's a batch of farro, and you can see that about 10 pounds of farro would have been composted.  Erica: Excess bulk foods, from places like hospitals and campus dining services, are being repurposed into balanced plates.  Individually packaged meals, ready to warm and eat.  their destinations?  >> Schools or adult education centers, K through 12 public schools, community colleges.  Erica: It's called Heaters, and the program is just one of many programs that are powered by food for free, based on SOMERVILLE.  Has been providing food from landfills since 1981. Up to a thousand meals like this are served each week.  >> We make approximately 12 stops a day.  If you order EVERYONE FOOD FREE, we want to give you 7 days a week.  Erica: Dominic Carter is one of the free foods for logisticians.  He invited us to connect.  >> Let's do it.  Erica: Thanks for taking me with you.  >> at any time.  Erica: On this day, we headed to the community school in nearby East Boston.  >> Good to see you.  Erica: Leah Gregory is the program coordinator.  >> Harborside is an adult education program in East Boston.  We have native language literacy classes, ESL classes, graduate school equivalents, and a family skills programme.  Erica: It says thanks for the free food, they help up to 200 families a week.  Hunger should never be a barrier to getting around, Leah says.  >> It is very important to meet these necessities, so you can learn, go to classes and go to night school.  >> Right now, Massachusetts has somewhere around 15% to 16% of households that are food insecure.  This figure is even higher for families with children, at 21%.  Erica: In this season of Thanksgiving, free food is a thank you for the food donors, and volunteers too, who do the portioning and packing.  >> The program can get as big as possible just because we have volunteers to turn these donations into bite-sized meals.  Erica: Through programs like this, Food for Rescue frees up 8,000,000 pounds of food a year, serving 40,000 locals.
                                </p><div>
                            <div class="mobile">
                                        <!-- blocks/ad.twig -->

How a Massachusetts nonprofit is saving food about to get thrown out

                <!-- article/blocks/byline -->

            </div>








                Bulk plus foods from places like Massachusetts hospitals and campus dining services are reimagined in balanced plates and single servings that are packaged and ready to heat and eat.  The program is called Heat-n-Eats, and it's just one of many programs run by Food For Free, which is based in Somerville.  The nonprofit has been saving food from landfills since 1981. Up to a thousand meals like these are delivered each week.  "We do about 12 stops a day," said Dominic Carter, one of Food For Free's logistics specialists.  "If you asked everyone who works at Food For Free, we'd want to serve it 7 days a week."  Harborside, an adult education program in East Boston, has native language literacy, ESL, high school equivalency and family literacy classes: Thanks to Food for Free, they're helping as many as 200 people, says Leah Gregory, program coordinator. family per week.  Hunger should never be a barrier to going up, Leah says, with Gregory saying, "It's very important to meet these necessities so you can learn and go to classes and go to night school."  “Somewhere in Massachusetts there are about 15 to 16 percent of households that are food insecure,” said Sam McDermott, program director at Food For Free.  "This number is higher for families with children at 21 percent."  This Thanksgiving season, Food for Free is feeling grateful to the food donors and volunteers who do the portioning and packing.  "We have volunteers turning these donations into microwaveable meals," McDermott said.


            <div class="article-content--body-text">
                <strong class="dateline">Somerville, Mass -</strong>                                            Bulk plus foods from places like Massachusetts hospitals and campus dining services are reimagined in balanced plates and single servings that are packaged and ready to heat and eat. </p><!-- article/blocks/side-floater -->

The program is called Heat-n-Eats, and it’s just one of many programs run by Food For Free, which is based in Somerville. The nonprofit has been saving food from landfills since 1981. Up to a thousand meals like this are delivered each week.

“We do about 12 stops a day,” said Dominic Carter, a logistics specialist at Food For Free. “If you ask everyone who works at Food For Free, we like to deliver 7 days a week.”

Harborside, an adult education program in East Boston, has native language literacy classes, ESL, high school equivalency, and a family literacy program.

Thanks to Food for Free, they help up to 200 families a week, says Leah Gregory, program coordinator. Leah says that hunger should never be a barrier to upward movement.

“It is very important to meet these necessities so that you can learn and go to classes and go to night school,” said Gregory.

“Somewhere in Massachusetts there are about 15 to 16 percent of households that are food insecure,” said Sam McDermott, program director at Food For Free. “This number is higher for families with children at 21 percent.”

This Thanksgiving season, Food for Free is grateful for the food donors and volunteers who do the portioning and packing.

“The program can only get as big as we have volunteers to turn these donations into microwaveable meals,” McDermott said.

                                </div>




                                        </div>  

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: